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Zine making at Rainbow Heron Cafe

January’s Night Café took place on Sunday 28th at the Wellbeing Centre, with people gathering to make zines or chat and play games. Visiting artist/ workshop leader Chella Quint talked us through zine-making- folding up a piece of paper into eighths and cutting a hole in it, then folding the edges through the middle to make a book or magazine shape. It takes a couple of attempts, but looks impressive once it’s done, with six internal pages between the front and back covers.

The idea of the zines is to write down things to remember or tips to help yourself through day to day life; it can be something serious, like six things to be proud of, or ways to look after yourself, or something as light-hearted as six favourite bands, or most satisfying household chores. Pictures are optional.

Although it’s not necessary for anyone apart from the makers to see these handbooks, DIY self-publication is a medium long associated with political resistance and artistic movements; after printing was invented, political and religious figures of the day would use printed pamphlets to spread their ideas. From the 1930s to 1960s, science fiction enthusiasts began to produce fan magazines, later abbreviated to zines, featuring their own original work and later, the riot grrrl movement of the 1990s used them as a means to write about feminist themes. In this context, they are meant as a means to remember good moments, and cope with difficult ones.

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Boxing Day Birdwatching – how a day in the fresh air offered a change in the busy festive period.

by Jack Nuttgens

I spent most of Boxing Day on a birdwatching trip at RSPB Fairburn Ings with my dad. It was the perfect follow-up to the house being full of people and excess of food on Christmas Day; it was sunny, we were in the fresh air (though it was quite windy) and we enjoyed a brisk walk among the trees, around the edge of the lake. And, of course, we were lucky enough to see a wide variety of birds.

 

I won’t spend ages talking about birds, but I enjoy birdwatching (and seeing any kind of animal in the wild) because, amongst other things, they seem to have different personalities; the Northern Shoveller, a duck with a very long bill, looks comically serious; slim, white Little Egrets strut through the mud as though they don’t want to get their feet dirty, and a bright pink male bullfinch eating seeds from a feeder looks flamboyant until it’s chased away by a territorial robin.

 

The rewarding (and frustrating) thing about birdwatching is that it requires patience. Sitting down in a hide and scanning the surroundings, it can appear at first that there isn’t much to see. But after a while- focusing binoculars or a telescope in on a distant group of birds, or identifying something on an island or post, the diversity of life in the scene becomes clear. Small birds in particular, such as finches and sparrows, will fly away at the slightest noise or movement, but waiting a couple of minutes can show you an impressive range of species. And because many birds migrate, revisiting the same place at different times of year will enable you to see different species. What’s more, birdwatchers are usually friendly and enjoy sharing their knowledge with newcomers, especially if there’s something rare around.

 

Apart from seeing plenty of wildlife, the day at Fairburn Ings was a chance to get out of the city. Nature reserves are usually planned to attract threatened species by creating habitats, so most of the best ones for spotting creatures are outside of towns and cities, but some are conveniently close. The Yorkshire Wildlife Trust site Potteric Carr, on the outskirts of Doncaster, has an overgrown, industrial feel, with abandoned train tracks running through it. I haven’t found evidence that going to the countryside and being around plants and wildlife is beneficial to mental health in itself, but Mind’s website has articles about the therapeutic effects of gardening (ecotherapy), and I find that being able to go outside, take a walk and reflect is usually a good idea.

 

Of course, designated nature reserves aren’t the only places that are worth visiting. The benefits of exercising every day, from walking to more challenging sports, are well-documented. So although some of them can be a bit of a trek, nature reserves can be a fun and relaxing place to visit.

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Rainbow Heron’s Self Care Cafe

BY JACK NUTTGENS

Rainbow Heron Night Café- 26th November

The Rainbow Heron Night Café is a safe space for young people to meet on a Sunday evening. Based at the Wellbeing Centre (formerly/ run by Mind?) on 110 Sharrow Lane, it provides activities designed to promote mental wellbeing and self-care, but the people who attend can use the time as they like. When I arrived, one table was beginning to paint plant pots, while another was making mood and task calendars.

The rainbow theme is prominent throughout the room; on one wall is a long mural/ painting celebrating difference, and even the snacks laid out contain almost every colour of the rainbow.

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Around the table, conversations flow pleasantly as people exchange paint colours, brushes and jugs of water. I haven’t picked up a paintbrush since Year Eight or Nine, but found something relaxing about the painting. On our table, some people use masking tape to keep broad strips of the pot free from paint, and make triangular or swirly patterns. Others draw festively themed pots, with penguins in Santa hats, or cartoonish owls and foxes. I draw a tree and some birds, thinking of the Rainbow Heron motif.

At the other table, some people are making Mood Calendars, ruling tiny squares onto bit sheets of card and colour-coding different moods down the side to fill in the days with their feelings. I start on a task calendar, matching the days to tasks that I want to accomplish.

This craft activity, like some others on offer, involves thinking about and recording coping mechanisms. As I see it, Rainbow Heron is a space where everyone can talk about mental health, but nobody has to. The atmosphere is positive; around the table, some people talk frankly about services available, but the conversation also touches on YouTube vloggers and cats. After working on a task calendar for a while, I go back to my pot (now dry), and fill it partway with soil to plant a sprig of lavender in it.

The sessions run from 7 p.m. till 11, but people are welcome to drop in and leave at whatever point they prefer.  The success, as far as I can tell, comes from the relaxed nature; nobody has to take part, and people chat freely, coming and going as they please. I leave at around ten, with my pot, looking forward to the next one.

 

The Rainbow Heron Night Café is a safe space for young people that aims to promote mental wellbeing. The project takes place once a month at the Wellbeing Centre at 110 Sharrow Lane from 7 p.m. to 11 p.m. For further details, contact us