Lizzy posts

Excersise isn’t just for your body: Escapism and literature

The first post on healthy escapism is on reading, and this is purely because it is without a doubt my favourite way to distract myself from any of my own worries, as well as calm myself down and ground myself.

Often, the most common suggestion made to people suffering from mental health issues is exercise, fresh air, “get out and about!” or “you just need to get your blood pumping!” are things that can often be heard over and over again.

The problem is that when people are in the midst of a mental health crisis, getting out of bed can be an Everest size climb in itself.

Literature is a beautiful way to escape intrusive thoughts from the comfort of your own home. Research has found that one of the main psychological benefits of reading is the ability it gives one to be able to relate to others, and different ways of looking at the world.

In the midst of a mental health crisis, changing our outlook can be incredibly helpful and can often move us a step closer to lifting the fog and realising that the way we are thinking right this minute is temporary and will pass.

Personally, I find it easiest and most enjoyable to escape into non-fiction books, specifically autobiographies. Reading the autobiography of a person who interests you, for whatever reason, can be a form of comfort and can, in a strange way, make one feel slightly less alone.

Getting lost in somebody else’s story, whether fictional or non-fictional for a while can allow us to get out of our own, even if just for a short while. Even better is when we are able to relate so closely to a character that in some way we are able to find answers to our own problems in their stories.

Besides from reading a book, for somebody in the go podcasts are a fantastic way to fit a bit of escapism into a busy routine. My favourite at the moment is Maya Jama’s ‘When life gives you melons’ but there is a huge variety of E-books, documentaries and interviews available on the internet.

Podcasts can be integrated into walks, waits in queues, public transport or even a lunch break in a way that sometimes books cannot, but their distracting and comforting effect is very similar.

On a more practical note, integrating reading into your daily routine can improve sleeping patterns. Specifically reading a couple of chapters of a book before bed (not from an e reader as bright screens) can help us to wind down, and as we all know, a healthy and long sleep can do absolute wonders for our mental health.

At the moment, there is a wealth of mental health literature emerging that can be really directly helpful, but aside from that there is a whole world of escapism waiting for you. My next post will discuss how music can be a healthy form of escapism in much the same way as reading can.

 

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Lizzy posts

Help to keep us open!

Over the past year, the Rainbow Heron Cafe has helped many people throughout Sheffield and the surrounding area with issues surrounding mental health. As I know from my visit to the cafe, many members said that Rainbow Heron had filled a void that existed in Sheffield, being one of the only cafes of its kind in the area.

Rainbow Heron is a safe space for people to feel comfortable discussing their thoughts and experiences with understanding and like minded people. There have been many opportunities for expression through art, movement, discussion and many other outlets throughout the time the cafe has been open.

We are now looking to you to help us to keep doing good work. We want the opportunity to keep helping the people who have been visiting us, and to remain an active member of the Sheffield Community.

If you could spare anything you have to our just giving Just Giving Page it would mean the world and will help a charity so close to the hearts of many people in the Sheffield Community.

Thank You!

 

Lizzy posts

***EVENT ALERT***

[Sorry it has been a while since the last blog, deadlines have taken over]

Rainbow Heron in association with Chilypep and Sheffield MIND are proud to present an art, activism, youth and mental health event.

On Tuesday 5th June, 2018 at The Quaker Meeting House, 6-9pm. The event is open to all and will involved conversations, debates, presentations and discussions centred around how art and activism can help create a more inclusive future for young people when it comes to mental health.

Art is an important form of expression and has been shown to lessen feelings of depression and anxiety. Creating something is a way of being able to see with your own eyes something that you are feeling internally. Art is a way of externalising the feelings that you may otherwise struggle to express, giving them less power over you.

Although some people may not necessarily identify as artistic, everybody has something to give and art can come in the most abstract of forms.

If you think that this is something that might interest you, then please follow the link on this Poster for tickets and more information. There is no obligation to take part, observers are welcome, who knows – you might be inspired!

 

Lizzy posts

Community and Kindness Week 3: Getting involved.

(Sorry this week’s post is slightly late!)

Just a quick, practical and to the point post this week. Over the last two weeks I’ve talked about the benefits of getting involved in the local community, or even volunteering on a personal level. So I thought this week it might be a good idea to actually provide you with some impressive local initiatives that you can join (I’ve done half the work already – so you have no excuse not to!).

The Sheffield Volunteer Centre on Rockingham Street has a drop-in face to face service able to provide advice to people who are interested in volunteering. You can also create your own profile which organisations can then view if they are looking for someone.

Link: http://www.sheffieldvolunteercentre.org.uk/start-volunteering

Going more down the community route, something I found really interesting was the Terminus initiative. Since 2002 the initiative runs events promoting better health & wellbeing for the local community in Lowedges, Batemoor & Jordanthorpe. Currently runs Community Food Growing Project, community lunches (including cooking), boxing club, children’s activities, information about local courses and other events. Previous groups have included dance classes, mental wellbeing sessions.

This could be the sort of place you contact to volunteer, but also to attend and make use of the events and activities.

Link: https://www.facebook.com/TheTerminusInitiative/

For any students at the University of Sheffield looking to get into volunteering, the Sheffield University Volunteering Centre is a great source of information (it’s actually how I ended up writing these posts). You create a profile and list your preferences and will get weekly email updates. Some opportunities are just one offs, others are weekly, semipermanent or permanent positions.

Link: https://www.sheffieldvolunteering.com/

I hope these links give you a good starting point to get involved in your local community. Talking from experience – you won’t ever look back. Its a rewarding and highly educational experience. If you have any of your own volunteering experiences or resources, please comment or share below.

Jack posts

Zine making at Rainbow Heron Cafe

January’s Night Café took place on Sunday 28th at the Wellbeing Centre, with people gathering to make zines or chat and play games. Visiting artist/ workshop leader Chella Quint talked us through zine-making- folding up a piece of paper into eighths and cutting a hole in it, then folding the edges through the middle to make a book or magazine shape. It takes a couple of attempts, but looks impressive once it’s done, with six internal pages between the front and back covers.

The idea of the zines is to write down things to remember or tips to help yourself through day to day life; it can be something serious, like six things to be proud of, or ways to look after yourself, or something as light-hearted as six favourite bands, or most satisfying household chores. Pictures are optional.

Although it’s not necessary for anyone apart from the makers to see these handbooks, DIY self-publication is a medium long associated with political resistance and artistic movements; after printing was invented, political and religious figures of the day would use printed pamphlets to spread their ideas. From the 1930s to 1960s, science fiction enthusiasts began to produce fan magazines, later abbreviated to zines, featuring their own original work and later, the riot grrrl movement of the 1990s used them as a means to write about feminist themes. In this context, they are meant as a means to remember good moments, and cope with difficult ones.