Lizzy posts

***EVENT ALERT***

[Sorry it has been a while since the last blog, deadlines have taken over]

Rainbow Heron in association with Chilypep and Sheffield MIND are proud to present an art, activism, youth and mental health event.

On Tuesday 5th June, 2018 at The Quaker Meeting House, 6-9pm. The event is open to all and will involved conversations, debates, presentations and discussions centred around how art and activism can help create a more inclusive future for young people when it comes to mental health.

Art is an important form of expression and has been shown to lessen feelings of depression and anxiety. Creating something is a way of being able to see with your own eyes something that you are feeling internally. Art is a way of externalising the feelings that you may otherwise struggle to express, giving them less power over you.

Although some people may not necessarily identify as artistic, everybody has something to give and art can come in the most abstract of forms.

If you think that this is something that might interest you, then please follow the link on this Poster for tickets and more information. There is no obligation to take part, observers are welcome, who knows – you might be inspired!

 

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Lizzy posts

Community and Kindness Week 3: Getting involved.

(Sorry this week’s post is slightly late!)

Just a quick, practical and to the point post this week. Over the last two weeks I’ve talked about the benefits of getting involved in the local community, or even volunteering on a personal level. So I thought this week it might be a good idea to actually provide you with some impressive local initiatives that you can join (I’ve done half the work already – so you have no excuse not to!).

The Sheffield Volunteer Centre on Rockingham Street has a drop-in face to face service able to provide advice to people who are interested in volunteering. You can also create your own profile which organisations can then view if they are looking for someone.

Link: http://www.sheffieldvolunteercentre.org.uk/start-volunteering

Going more down the community route, something I found really interesting was the Terminus initiative. Since 2002 the initiative runs events promoting better health & wellbeing for the local community in Lowedges, Batemoor & Jordanthorpe. Currently runs Community Food Growing Project, community lunches (including cooking), boxing club, children’s activities, information about local courses and other events. Previous groups have included dance classes, mental wellbeing sessions.

This could be the sort of place you contact to volunteer, but also to attend and make use of the events and activities.

Link: https://www.facebook.com/TheTerminusInitiative/

For any students at the University of Sheffield looking to get into volunteering, the Sheffield University Volunteering Centre is a great source of information (it’s actually how I ended up writing these posts). You create a profile and list your preferences and will get weekly email updates. Some opportunities are just one offs, others are weekly, semipermanent or permanent positions.

Link: https://www.sheffieldvolunteering.com/

I hope these links give you a good starting point to get involved in your local community. Talking from experience – you won’t ever look back. Its a rewarding and highly educational experience. If you have any of your own volunteering experiences or resources, please comment or share below.

Jack posts

Zine making at Rainbow Heron Cafe

January’s Night Café took place on Sunday 28th at the Wellbeing Centre, with people gathering to make zines or chat and play games. Visiting artist/ workshop leader Chella Quint talked us through zine-making- folding up a piece of paper into eighths and cutting a hole in it, then folding the edges through the middle to make a book or magazine shape. It takes a couple of attempts, but looks impressive once it’s done, with six internal pages between the front and back covers.

The idea of the zines is to write down things to remember or tips to help yourself through day to day life; it can be something serious, like six things to be proud of, or ways to look after yourself, or something as light-hearted as six favourite bands, or most satisfying household chores. Pictures are optional.

Although it’s not necessary for anyone apart from the makers to see these handbooks, DIY self-publication is a medium long associated with political resistance and artistic movements; after printing was invented, political and religious figures of the day would use printed pamphlets to spread their ideas. From the 1930s to 1960s, science fiction enthusiasts began to produce fan magazines, later abbreviated to zines, featuring their own original work and later, the riot grrrl movement of the 1990s used them as a means to write about feminist themes. In this context, they are meant as a means to remember good moments, and cope with difficult ones.