Lizzy posts

***EVENT ALERT***

[Sorry it has been a while since the last blog, deadlines have taken over]

Rainbow Heron in association with Chilypep and Sheffield MIND are proud to present an art, activism, youth and mental health event.

On Tuesday 5th June, 2018 at The Quaker Meeting House, 6-9pm. The event is open to all and will involved conversations, debates, presentations and discussions centred around how art and activism can help create a more inclusive future for young people when it comes to mental health.

Art is an important form of expression and has been shown to lessen feelings of depression and anxiety. Creating something is a way of being able to see with your own eyes something that you are feeling internally. Art is a way of externalising the feelings that you may otherwise struggle to express, giving them less power over you.

Although some people may not necessarily identify as artistic, everybody has something to give and art can come in the most abstract of forms.

If you think that this is something that might interest you, then please follow the link on this Poster for tickets and more information. There is no obligation to take part, observers are welcome, who knows – you might be inspired!

 

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Jack posts

Rainbow Heron’s Self Care Cafe

BY JACK NUTTGENS

Rainbow Heron Night Café- 26th November

The Rainbow Heron Night Café is a safe space for young people to meet on a Sunday evening. Based at the Wellbeing Centre (formerly/ run by Mind?) on 110 Sharrow Lane, it provides activities designed to promote mental wellbeing and self-care, but the people who attend can use the time as they like. When I arrived, one table was beginning to paint plant pots, while another was making mood and task calendars.

The rainbow theme is prominent throughout the room; on one wall is a long mural/ painting celebrating difference, and even the snacks laid out contain almost every colour of the rainbow.

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Around the table, conversations flow pleasantly as people exchange paint colours, brushes and jugs of water. I haven’t picked up a paintbrush since Year Eight or Nine, but found something relaxing about the painting. On our table, some people use masking tape to keep broad strips of the pot free from paint, and make triangular or swirly patterns. Others draw festively themed pots, with penguins in Santa hats, or cartoonish owls and foxes. I draw a tree and some birds, thinking of the Rainbow Heron motif.

At the other table, some people are making Mood Calendars, ruling tiny squares onto bit sheets of card and colour-coding different moods down the side to fill in the days with their feelings. I start on a task calendar, matching the days to tasks that I want to accomplish.

This craft activity, like some others on offer, involves thinking about and recording coping mechanisms. As I see it, Rainbow Heron is a space where everyone can talk about mental health, but nobody has to. The atmosphere is positive; around the table, some people talk frankly about services available, but the conversation also touches on YouTube vloggers and cats. After working on a task calendar for a while, I go back to my pot (now dry), and fill it partway with soil to plant a sprig of lavender in it.

The sessions run from 7 p.m. till 11, but people are welcome to drop in and leave at whatever point they prefer.  The success, as far as I can tell, comes from the relaxed nature; nobody has to take part, and people chat freely, coming and going as they please. I leave at around ten, with my pot, looking forward to the next one.

 

The Rainbow Heron Night Café is a safe space for young people that aims to promote mental wellbeing. The project takes place once a month at the Wellbeing Centre at 110 Sharrow Lane from 7 p.m. to 11 p.m. For further details, contact us